How to prepare for 1st year MBBS exams in last 2 months

The term ‘MBBS’ has a whole different feeling before stepping into a medical college. ‘Medicinae Baccalaurues Baccalaureus Chirurgiae’ also known as ‘Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery’, which is abbreviated as MBBS is studied under 3 headings, vizPre-clinical (1st and 2nd semesters), Paraclinical (3rd, 4th and 5th semesters), and Clinical (6th, 7th, 8th and 9th semester) followed by a rotating internship and an entrance exam known as NEET-PG for further courses in MD/MS and Diploma.

So speaking about the pre-clinical year, i.e, the first year in a med school, the students are all excited to begin their so-called ‘professional career’ as a medico. Roaming around with a ‘white coat’ gives a proud feeling and a sense of ‘future doctors’.

But when it comes to academics, Oh! how we drown ourselves into the books, just like a bee sucks the nectar from a flower, we, medicos, try to grasp in everything our brain can memorize and accumulate from the subjects, sometimes a bit more extra, Yeah?

MBBS first year subjects:

Dealing with Anatomy is like dealing with the universe – the subject is always unending even if you feel satisfied with whatever you have learned and with whatever you know. Physiology is similar to Physics – the most hated subject by most of us, once upon a time. And Biochemistry? pretty chill – just like our weekend parties.

Days and months pass by and then we realize – Oof! it’s time to gear up!

2 months left — Panic! Panic! Panic... Everywhere… All around us… We search for strategies to study from seniors, from experts, from various platforms, videos, etc, etc.

So why worry?

Here are some preparation tips for the 1st professional exam for the last 2 months of the pre-clinical course.

Firstly, prepare yourself mentally as well as physically to study for hours with focus and concentration. Secondly, don’t entirely work hard at the last moment, you will lose your confidence. Smart work along with hard work will fetch you a good score. Thirdly, DO NOT switch to new books when you have already studied stuff from the books you own.

So beginning with the study tips:

For Anatomy, refer to the books you have already studied from, previously. Start revising the important chapters first, mainly the important concepts and just not everything about that chapter. Remember, diagrams are like the heart and brain of anatomy. You may not know an answer, but make sure you are thorough with its diagram to score some amount of marks. Do not forget to make mnemonics of your own to remember the names and relations of some parts. Not all mnemonics given in the book can be remembered, so make keywords, flashcards, flowcharts, and make use of multiple highlighters if a concept has to drag your attention. Also, concentrate more on clinical correlations and diagnosis.

For Physiology, the same goes for the usage of books as mentioned for anatomy. But physiology cannot be studied from a single book. So make sure to refer to the same books that you have previously referred for some particular chapters and/or concepts. Here, you have to remember that majorly, physiology can be studied by flowcharts. Make your own flowcharts, in a way that is easy to remember, especially the mechanisms. Also, make sure you study the graphs thoroughly and if possible, frame questions on them and try to solve them. Here, you also have to remember to study the clinical significance of each chapter, their diagnosis and their linkage with the concepts.

For Biochemistry, nothing much, but most importantly practice the biochemical cycles and reactions. Because that’s where we get stuck at – the enzymes, the carrier molecules, and intermediates. Also, give importance to enzymes used in the diagnosis of diseases. 

How to know if a concept is important or not?

Guess it – the concepts that confuse and irritate you carry importance and they must be studied. And also, refer to the question bank/previous years question papers to know the important concepts.

How to test yourself if you have studied enough or not?

Once you are done studying a subject, pull out a question paper and solve it roughly. You will know your caliber and then you can focus on improvising.

Don’t let your mental health be ignored.

Study and sleep for enough time. Sip coffee or just jump out of your study place for a while when you feel stressed. Spend at least few minutes in a day in the morning on meditation or yoga to keep your mind fresh and alert.

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